writers' hub
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FEATURES   (Page 2 of 3)

The first interview in our new series focusing on Independent Publishers. Katherine Vik speaks to Marina Rodrigues of Alma Books.


Maggie Womersley suggests some Literary Festivals for your 2013 ‘To Do’ list. Add your recommendations to the comments at the end...


It's hard enough to find the time write without the added distractions of blogging and social media - but what are the benefits of blogging for writers? Emily Benet makes a case...


Prajwal Parajuly, author of The Gurkha's Daughter - a collection of short stories published by Quercus last week, writes about why he chose to write short stories.


With only 8 shopping days to go until Christmas, Maggie Womersley presents her top nine last minute gifts for the writer in your life.


Zoë Ranson interviews Simon Okotie on the Routemaster bus about his new book Whatever Happened to Harold Absalon?


Wayne Macauley takes a satirical look at our celebrity-chef and fancy food fetishising culture in his new book The Cook.


You can buy a book on Amazon or in a supermarket but you can't buy this...the Big Green Bookshop is in the business of building a community.


Helen Bode interviews Phoebe Blatton about the Coelacanth Press.


The real trials and tribulations of an author's life...


Niven Govinden speaks to us about fictional depictions of marriage and the future of the book.


Rachel Connor and Laura Wilkinson talk about the representations of female identity and motherhood in their books, and the sources of their inspiration.


Martina Evans interviews Nicholas Murray of the Welsh-based Rack Press about the revolution in small press publishing.


Maggie Womersley interviews Stefan Tobler, founder of innovative independent publisher And Other Stories.


Poet and author Kavita Jindal shares insight into The HarperCollins Book of English Poetry, a new anthology to which she contributed, published in July 2012. 


Maggie Womersley interviews Clare Mulley - the award-winning author of two critically acclaimed biographies: The Woman Who Saved the Children (2009) and The Spy who Loved, published last month.


Gaynor Arnold

Gaynor Arnold writes about comparisons to Lytton Strachey and about the opportunities afforded by 'the small gaps where history is silent, or the points at which facts give way to speculation'. After the success of the Booker longlisted Girl in a Blue Dress about Charles Dickens' marriage, Gaynor Arnold's latest book concerns another 'Eminent Victorian' - Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) and his relationship with the child, Alice Liddell.

 


Joanna Kavenna's novel Come to the Edge was published by Quercus last week, 'a satire about social injustice, rural Britain and the widening gulf between rich and poor'. Here she writes about the attitude readers and publishers have towards comic writing - that it is frequently mistrusted and undervalued despite its significant heritage.


Kavita Jindal investigates Unbound's innovative crowd-funding-based publishing model.


Jean McNeil reports back on the 'Millionaire Boot Camp for Authors'.


'The future of publishing is all about using new technology to improve access and break down barriers between writers and their audience...'


The launch of The Alliance of Independent Authors took place two weeks ago at the London Book Fair...


Rebecca Rouillard interrogates Birkbeck lecturer Benjamin Wood about his sinister debut novel The Bellwether Revivals, which was published by Simon and Schuster in February this year.


Is literary fiction dying? Charlie Hill charges up the defibrillator with a proposal for a 'Literary Fiction Manifesto'...


Why don't writers write novels that involve technology? Well, they do – just not often. Prescient themes of privacy, artificial intelligence, alternate reality, identity and gaming all come together in Mez Packer's new literary novel The Game is Altered – a super-contemporary piece of techno-fiction that asks the question: where do the boundaries of reality now lie? The author writes about the problem of reconciling technology and literary fiction...


On the centenary of Scott's expedition to the South Pole, Jean McNeil chronicles her own voyage to Antarctica.

'Each day we see more and more ice. As we sail into a shifting matrix of sea-ice everything is in motion.  Icebergs assail each other, they grind and groan. The sea is soupy with ice. The air stings'...


The high-brows and low-brows unite at last against a new threat—the wild, untamed indie-brow.


Toby Litt proposes some theories to explain the subversive undertones of J.G. Ballard's writing - subterranean tunnelling or something more sinister...


Julia Bell discusses the role of truth in fiction as part of the Birkbeck BA Creative Writing 'Life of a Writer Series'.


SJ Ahmed met with novelist Joanna Briscoe and discussed the moors and the similarly 'tough and unpredictable terrain' of novel writing.


Kavita Bhanot

Kavita Bhanot introduces 'Too Asian, Not Asian Enough': An Anthology of New British Asian Fiction.


Gavin James Bower is the author of two novels. His second Made in Britain, concerning three teenagers living in a deprived town in the North of England and seeking escape through drink and drugs, has just been published by Quartet. John Lucas interviewed him recently.


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