writers' hub
   20.12.14 1 | 2    
RESOURCES   (Page 1 of 2)

A round-up of the latest writing competitions - this page will be updated regularly so check back for further details.


A round-up of the latest poetry competitions - this page will be updated regularly so check back for further details.


In an excerpt from her new book, London Gin: The Gin Craze, Birkbeck alumnus Thea Bennett tells us how to make the perfect gin and tonic...


Twenty points on how to get published, from an editor’s perspective…


It is notoriously difficult to earn a living as a writer. Rachael Oku gives us some tips from her new book, Become a Freelance Writer, on how to set yourself up in the business...


A comprehensive list of UK & Irish Literary Magazines that publish short stories...


We have collected together some of the best writing and publishing advice available on the Hub from the last year and put together a list for you...


"All I can do is turn a phrase until it catches the light," writes Clive James in the epilogue to May Week Was In June. Kate McLoughlin explains why the book means so much to her in a new series of Staff Picks. 


Nicola Morgan

Most writers hate writing synopses. In her ebook, Write a Great Synopsis – An Expert Guide, Nicola Morgan takes the stress out of the subject and applies calm, systematic guidance...


Sally O'Reilly

Sally O'Reilly, author of  How to Be A Writer, gives us some tips on getting started.


An excerpt from Zoë Fairbairns' new book.


Some writing exercises from Liane Strauss - where we’re from, where we live, who we are...


Julia Bell discusses how Character works in fiction.


This autumn brings us an exciting literary festival, 'Spread the Word'. Held in London, it offers writers a different mixture of events and workshops.


Writing the City

In this fifth installation, the supernatural is discussed as it is its role in fiction and literature. Both in Asia and the world.


Writing the City

In the fourth of Writing the City's series of inspirational films, Suchen Christine Lim and Jeremy Sheldon discuss the role of fiction in preserving and representing the past, especially from the subjective point of view of an individual character.


The Arvon Foundation presents 'Urban Arvon' - an exciting set of creative writing courses held over three days at Birkbeck's Gordon Square site in central London.


A selection of one-off literary events, workshop and festivals around the country.


Writing the City

The second in Writing the City's series of films focuses on the way characters' internal feelings interact or come into conflict with those of other characters.


A round-up of the latest residential creative writing retreats - this page will be updated regularly so check back for further details.


The Hub presents a seven part series in which author Orna Ross examines the various stages of the creative process. 

 

An introduction:

 

The Seven Stages of The Creative Process are: Intention -> Incubation -> Investigation -> Composition -> Amplification -> Completion -> Implementation.

 

These stages are not mutually exclusive, as implied by separating and laying them out in a list like this. In practice, they interweave around each other in an interactive dance but isolating each stage is useful. It allows us to catch hold of a process that is, by definition amorphous, unconventional, anarchic, flexible, spontaneous and difficult to pin down.

          It also facilitates us in understanding the quite different challenges inherent in each stage of the process.

          One of the main reasons that creative projects become derailed is because we bring in thoughts and behaviours appropriate to a different stage. A common example is writers who try to edit into shape (amplification stage) their early ideas and insights (incubation stage), instead of allowing them full formation.

          Over the coming seven months, I’ll be examining these seven stages of the process as they apply to a long writing project like a book, blog series or film script. Each month I’ll focus in on one stage, working through from Intention to Implemention, outlining the defining experience of each, exploring its particular challenges and offering exercises that will enable you to meet them.

 

This month: Part Seven - Completion (Finishing & Sharing)


Writing the City

The second in Writing the City's series of films focuses on how essential characters are to a story, how characters are created and the way stories can hinge on the contradiction between characters’ inner and outer worlds.


Writing the City

The Hub presents The Writer's Eye, the first in a series of short films from the British Council's Writing the City project. This film focuses on the reasons writers choose to include details in their writing and the way this can help convey a sense of place or a character’s feelings.


Orna Ross

The Hub presents a seven part series in which author Orna Ross examines the various stages of the creative process. 

 

An introduction:

 

The Seven Stages of The Creative Process are: Intention -> Incubation -> Investigation -> Composition -> Amplification -> Completion -> Implementation.

 

These stages are not mutually exclusive, as implied by separating and laying them out in a list like this. In practice, they interweave around each other in an interactive dance but isolating each stage is useful. It allows us to catch hold of a process that is, by definition amorphous, unconventional, anarchic, flexible, spontaneous and difficult to pin down.

          It also facilitates us in understanding the quite different challenges inherent in each stage of the process.

          One of the main reasons that creative projects become derailed is because we bring in thoughts and behaviours appropriate to a different stage. A common example is writers who try to edit into shape (amplification stage) their early ideas and insights (incubation stage), instead of allowing them full formation.

          Over the coming seven months, I’ll be examining these seven stages of the process as they apply to a long writing project like a book, blog series or film script. Each month I’ll focus in on one stage, working through from Intention to Implemention, outlining the defining experience of each, exploring its particular challenges and offering exercises that will enable you to meet them.

 

This month - Stage Five: CLARIFICATION


Orna Ross

The Hub presents a seven part series in which author Orna Ross examines the various stages of the creative process. 

 

An introduction:

 

The Seven Stages of The Creative Process are: Intention -> Incubation -> Investigation -> Composition -> Amplification -> Completion -> Implementation.

 

These stages are not mutually exclusive, as implied by separating and laying them out in a list like this. In practice, they interweave around each other in an interactive dance but isolating each stage is useful. It allows us to catch hold of a process that is, by definition amorphous, unconventional, anarchic, flexible, spontaneous and difficult to pin down.

          It also facilitates us in understanding the quite different challenges inherent in each stage of the process.

          One of the main reasons that creative projects become derailed is because we bring in thoughts and behaviours appropriate to a different stage. A common example is writers who try to edit into shape (amplification stage) their early ideas and insights (incubation stage), instead of allowing them full formation.

          Over the coming seven months, I’ll be examining these seven stages of the process as they apply to a long writing project like a book, blog series or film script. Each month I’ll focus in on one stage, working through from Intention to Implemention, outlining the defining experience of each, exploring its particular challenges and offering exercises that will enable you to meet them.

 

This month - Stage Five: Amplification


Orna Ross

The Hub presents a seven part series in which author Orna Ross examines the various stages of the creative process. 

 

An introduction:

 

The Seven Stages of The Creative Process are: Intention -> Incubation -> Investigation -> Composition -> Amplification -> Completion -> Implementation.

 

These stages are not mutually exclusive, as implied by separating and laying them out in a list like this. In practice, they interweave around each other in an interactive dance but isolating each stage is useful. It allows us to catch hold of a process that is, by definition amorphous, unconventional, anarchic, flexible, spontaneous and difficult to pin down.

          It also facilitates us in understanding the quite different challenges inherent in each stage of the process.

          One of the main reasons that creative projects become derailed is because we bring in thoughts and behaviours appropriate to a different stage. A common example is writers who try to edit into shape (amplification stage) their early ideas and insights (incubation stage), instead of allowing them full formation.

          Over the coming seven months, I’ll be examining these seven stages of the process as they apply to a long writing project like a book, blog series or film script. Each month I’ll focus in on one stage, working through from Intention to Implemention, outlining the defining experience of each, exploring its particular challenges and offering exercises that will enable you to meet them.

 

This month: Stage Four - Composition

 


Orna Ross

The Hub presents a seven part series in which author Orna Ross examines the various stages of the creative process. 

 

An introduction:

 

The Seven Stages of The Creative Process are: Intention -> Incubation -> Investigation -> Composition -> Amplification -> Completion -> Implementation.

 

These stages are not mutually exclusive, as implied by separating and laying them out in a list like this. In practice, they interweave around each other in an interactive dance but isolating each stage is useful. It allows us to catch hold of a process that is, by definition amorphous, unconventional, anarchic, flexible, spontaneous and difficult to pin down.

          It also facilitates us in understanding the quite different challenges inherent in each stage of the process.

          One of the main reasons that creative projects become derailed is because we bring in thoughts and behaviours appropriate to a different stage. A common example is writers who try to edit into shape (amplification stage) their early ideas and insights (incubation stage), instead of allowing them full formation.

          Over the coming seven months, I’ll be examining these seven stages of the process as they apply to a long writing project like a book, blog series or film script. Each month I’ll focus in on one stage, working through from Intention to Implemention, outlining the defining experience of each, exploring its particular challenges and offering exercises that will enable you to meet them.

 

This month: Stage Three - Investigation


Where to send your short fiction

Here's a link to a pretty comprehensive (yet, we are assured, incomplete) list of literary magazines in the UK and Ireland that invite short story submissions.  


An ongoing compilation of written and audio pieces produced by the Hub.


Orna Ross

 

The Hub presents a seven part series in which author Orna Ross examines the various stages of the creative process. 

 

An introduction:

 

The Seven Stages of The Creative Process are: Intention -> Incubation -> Investigation -> Composition -> Amplification -> Completion -> Implementation.

 

These stages are not mutually exclusive, as implied by separating and laying them out in a list like this. In practice, they interweave around each other in an interactive dance but isolating each stage is useful. It allows us to catch hold of a process that is, by definition amorphous, unconventional, anarchic, flexible, spontaneous and difficult to pin down.

          It also facilitates us in understanding the quite different challenges inherent in each stage of the process.

          One of the main reasons that creative projects become derailed is because we bring in thoughts and behaviours appropriate to a different stage. A common example is writers who try to edit into shape (amplification stage) their early ideas and insights (incubation stage), instead of allowing them full formation.

          Over the coming seven months, I’ll be examining these seven stages of the process as they apply to a long writing project like a book, blog series or film script. Each month I’ll focus in on one stage, working through from Intention to Implemention, outlining the defining experience of each, exploring its particular challenges and offering exercises that will enable you to meet them.

 

This month: Stage two: Incubation

 


Orna Ross

 

The Hub presents a seven part series in which author Orna Ross examines the various stages of the creative process. 

 

An introduction:

 

The Seven Stages of The Creative Process are: Intention -> Incubation -> Investigation -> Composition -> Amplification -> Completion -> Implementation.

 

These stages are not mutually exclusive, as implied by separating and laying them out in a list like this. In practice, they interweave around each other in an interactive dance but isolating each stage is useful. It allows us to catch hold of a process that is, by definition amorphous, unconventional, anarchic, flexible, spontaneous and difficult to pin down.

          It also facilitates us in understanding the quite different challenges inherent in each stage of the process.

          One of the main reasons that creative projects become derailed is because we bring in thoughts and behaviours appropriate to a different stage. A common example is writers who try to edit into shape (amplification stage) their early ideas and insights (incubation stage), instead of allowing them full formation.

          Over the coming seven months, I’ll be examining these seven stages of the process as they apply to a long writing project like a book, blog series or film script. Each month I’ll focus in on one stage, working through from Intention to Implemention, outlining the defining experience of each, exploring its particular challenges and offering exercises that will enable you to meet them.

 

This month: Stage one: Creative intention

 


Novelist and tutor Jonathan Kemp treats us to some of his online treasures 


   20.12.14 1 | 2    
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